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Posts Tagged small business

Easy-Peasy Blog Post Template

My whole career has been a combination of corporate and small business hands on experience, and during the last decade I have watched on with interest, and attempted to participate, as the way businesses communicate their message to their customers has multiplied, technology driven mediums have increased, and consumer expectations of professional goods and services have soared.

After publishing my book, Separated by Work, I realised that to compete in today’s business world I had to immerse myself in learning the most up to date information available. Where was the best place to do that? University of course, where I am currently completing a Bachelor of Communication, majoring in PR and Social Media.

As I learn, I come across tools that make me recognise I have been mostly winging it for the last 10 years. Just hanging in there with passion and enthusiasm for my work, but ad-libbing my communication strategies it all the same. A couple of valuable templates I came across today are, what I believe to be, a business ‘must have’ and a ‘wish I could have had a long time ago’.

Content rules: how to create killer blogs, podcasts, videos, eBooks, webinars (and more) that engage customers and ignite your business is one of my social media subject’s texts. In the book, which I highly recommend you get a copy of, Handley and Chapman share a blog template and a content rules checklist. To get the links to their ‘secret insiders page’ you must buy the book, but I was so impressed with the book and the tools they share throughout and on their website I wanted to let all my business friends know.

I like to shout it out whenever I come across a wonderful piece of advice, a great product or upon receiving excellent service. So, to finish off I will borrow the final bit of advice from the end of the above recommended blog template:

Shout it! Spread the word! Tell your family! Your friends! Facebook! LinkedIn! Let your network know your post is live; generate excitement for the post and earn some well-deserved kudos.”

Have you read this book and used the tools? Do you have other tools that you find valuable in creating great content and getting your message to your customers? If so, please share them here, or your thoughts on the book.

Until next time, Kirsty 🙂

 

Posted in: Business

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Your Business, Your Target Market.

To be profitable in business it is imperative that your message reaches those that are most likely to want and need your service or product. Too often business owners make the mistake of not understanding what their potential buyers are thinking and who the major purchasers are. Kirsty O’Callaghan provides insight to reaching the right audience with the right message.

Firstly, research your target market and find out: what motivates them, what age bracket they are in, where do they live, what is their lifestyle, what specific problems can you solve for them and what benefits are you offering? You must decide who specifically you are trying to reach and who is the most profitable audience.  It has not been found to be effective or worthwhile to attempt to create a message and brand that will appeal to the masses.  It is better to narrow your market and niche your services for more success.

From your research, you will find it easier to identify what makes your service or brand unique and what is the single-minded thought or selling idea that will be bought to life by a persuasive headline. This will build a compelling reason for your potential customers to find out more about the service or product being offered to them. Your client must see your message as achievable, positive, and promising.

Then, to support the selling idea, design specific communication and marketing strategies to match the audience’s needs, wants and interests.  Consider: who are the buyers and users of your product (sometimes they can be different), where do they shop, where do they go for help or information, how many times do they need to see or hear your message or brand to decide to buy, and how can you appeal to your audience and engage with them?  To get the most response from your target audience you must get their attention, create interest and a desire for your service, then motivate them to action. Deciding if that action is purchase, enquiry, sample or brand awareness will make a difference to the message you are sending.

Finally make sure the way you communicate and market your product and business is harmonious across online and offline channels. Be specific, simple, on point and strategic.  Be creative yet stick to your marketing goals and budget, and keep evaluating your results and making changes where necessary.

Building relationships and your business to the level of success you are aiming for requires: a curiosity of how people think and act, accepting nothing at face value, looking at problems from different angles, putting yourself in your client’s shoes, constant research and learning, and an ability to plan and execute that plan.

Find the sweet spot where your potential clients are most likely to connect with you.  When a positive, memorable and meaningful connection is established between your brand and the consumer, then the business client relationship will be strong and sustainable.

Until next time, K 🙂

Posted in: Business, Resilience

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